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Wisconsin Injury Victims’ Testimonials August 5, 2010

Posted by Attorney Jonathan Groth in FAQ Personal Injury, Milwaukee Personal Injury Attorney, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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I have been blessed to have represented many good people over the years.  When you are looking to hire an attorney it is important to know that you will be a good fit with that attorney.  Again, I’ve fit in with my clients and I think this has worked well.  If you would like to get a feel for how my personal injury firm handles cases and clients I recommend you read the testimonials at Avvo.com.  You’ll find Wisconsin personal injury attorneys flooding the internet and TV.  Make sure you find the right one for you.

Below are a few testimonials from former clients:

Client Review:

All of the above is true for Jon Groth. I felt very comfortable meeting with Jon and found him to be very trustworthy. He was very responsive to me and my case and very concerned that I was ok. He is very knowledgeable and kept me informed continuously throughout. He helped me settle out of court and I believe I received a VERY fair settlement. I am very greatful to have found a very honest Attorney and would recommend him to all. You will see in talking to him he is the right choice.

Client Review:

I had the best possible expeience with Jon. I allows felt that he was on my side and would do whatever he could to get the best outcome for me! He always told it to me straight and gave his opinion, but always stated that it wsa all my choice and he would go with whatever decision I made. I could could not have asked for a better lawyer to help me. I would recommend Jon to anyone.

Client Review:

From start to finish, Jon was diligent in acheiving the best possible outcome for my case, which was a car accident where I sustained permanent injuries, and for which the other party was 100% at fault. He was the perfect balance of determination, patience, intellect, pragmatism and honesty. He answered phone calls and emails promptly and made me feel as if I were his only client.

Wisconsin Auto Accident Causing Tinnitus Injury Settlement August 2, 2010

Posted by Attorney Jonathan Groth in Milwaukee Personal Injury Attorney, Personal Groth, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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The Wisconsin Law Journal recently highlighted a Groth Law Firm, S.C. car accident settlement in Milwaukee County.  The case involved a rear end collision where the injured victim’s permenant injury was/is tinnitus.  The past medical bills were approximately $9,000.00.  The settlement totalled $95,000.00 (Ninety Five Thousand and 00/00). 

For more information about the injury and litigation firm, Groth Law Firm, S.C., visit www.grothlawfirm.com or visit www.avvo.com for client reviews and recent victories and settlements.

No Vehicle Damage? No Injury? August 1, 2010

Posted by Andrew Christman in FAQ Personal Injury, Milwaukee Personal Injury Attorney, Motorcycle Collisions, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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After an automobile accident, insurance companies often try to equate physical injuries to the damage to the automobile. This is not always true. It is possible for passengers in an automobile accident to be injured even if there is little or no damage to the vehicle. Additionally, insurance companies are likely to deny the existence of an injury in a low speed collision. Injuries to areas of soft tissue around the neck and spine are especially vulnerable in these types of collisions.

A great deal of information about car accident injuries can be found at http://www.injurytv.com/doctors/eldridge.html.

If you have been injured in an automobile accident in the Milwaukee area or any other area in Wisconsin and are in need of a Milwaukee personal injury attorney, contact Groth Law Firm S.C. Groth Law Firm, S.C. has offices to meet with clients in Brookfield, Milwaukee, Green Bay and Marinette.

New Wisconsin Auto Insurance Law June 9, 2010

Posted by Andrew Christman in FAQ Personal Injury, Motorcycle Collisions, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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As of June 1, 2010, auto insurance is now mandatory for all car owners in Wisconsin.  The law requires minimum coverage of $50,000 for the injury or death of one person, $100,000 for the injury or death of two or more people and $15,000 for property damage.  Drivers that do not have insurance can be fined up to $500.

The law requires that drives keep proof of their insurance information in the car.  Police officers can request proof of insurance at traffic stops and accidents.  Failure to provide this proof of insurance can result in a fine of $10.

The law also requires uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage each with minimum limits of $100,000/$300,000 for bodily injury coverage.

More information on the new insurance laws can be found at the websites for the Office of the Commissioner of Insurance and the Wisconsin Department of Motor Vehicles.

Feel free to contact Groth Law Firm, S.C. if you have any questions or would like to discuss your need for a personal injury attorney.  Groth Law Firm, S.C. has offices to meet with clients in Brookfield, Milwaukee, Green Bay and Marinette.

A Few Wisconsin Bike Laws June 8, 2010

Posted by Andrew Christman in FAQ Personal Injury, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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Wisconsin has numerous laws in place to ensure that the roads are safe for bikes.  Following laws regarding bicycling can help reduce the number of bike accidents and make the roads safer for bikes and cars alike.

Wisconsin Statute 346.075 provides that cars must give bikes a minimum of three feet of space when they are passing a bike.  Bikes must also allow at least three feet when they are passing another car or a stationary object in the street including parked cars. Wisconsin Statute 346.24 says if a car is stopped to yield right of way to someone on a bike, it is illegal for any approaching car to pass the stopped car.  Finally, according to 346.804, if local law permits riding a bicycle on a sidewalk, they must yield right of way to any pedestrians on the sidewalk.

If you have any questions regarding a bike accident or any other personal injury questions, feel free to contact Groth Law Firm, S.C. Groth Law Firm, S.C. has offices to meet with clients in Brookfield, Milwaukee, Green Bay and Marinette.

Interesting Wisconsin Law – Biking Without a Seat June 2, 2010

Posted by Andrew Christman in FAQ Personal Injury, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 346, Rules of the Road, has an interesting section buried within all the rules regulating the operation of both cars and bikes on the road.  According to Wisconsin Statute 346.79(1) it is illegal in the state to ride a bike that does not have a seat.  Those danger seekers who choose to violate the law should be aware that people who violate this bike law can face a fine of up to $20.

If you have any questions regarding a bike accident or any other personal injury questions, feel free to contact Groth Law Firm, S.C. Groth Law Firm, S.C. has offices to meet with clients in Brookfield, Milwaukee, Green Bay and Marinette.

Wisconsin Bicycle Law – Right of Way May 25, 2010

Posted by Andrew Christman in FAQ Personal Injury, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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Wisconsin outlines it laws regarding the use of bicycles in Wisconsin Statutes Chapter 346, Rules of the Road.  Included in this chapter are rules regarding when cyclists have the right of way, and when they must yield the right of way to motorists and pedestrians. Right of way problems can often lead to a bike accident.  Wisconsin has set up these rules to help ensure that the streets are safe for bikes and to prevent bicycle accidents.

According to Wisconsin Statute 346.23, at an intersection that is controlled by a stop light, a car must give way to someone bike crossing at a crosswalk when the person on a bike has started to cross the street with a green light or a “walk” signal.  If however the person on a bike has not yet started to cross the intersection or if that person is not crossing with a green light or a “walk” signal, the person on a bike must yield to someone in a car.   According to 346.34, at an intersection that is not controlled by a stop light, someone in a car must give right of way to someone on a bike providing they are crossing at a marked crosswalk.  People on bikes must yield right of way to cars if they are attempting to cross a street at any point that is not designated as a crosswalk.

Feel free to contact Groth Law Firm, S.C. if you have any questions or would like to discuss your need for a personal injury attorney whether it is due to a bicycle accident or any other injury.  Groth Law Firm, S.C. has offices to meet with clients in Brookfield, Milwaukee, Green Bay and Marinette.

Truck Accidents In Wisconsin May 21, 2010

Posted by Attorney Jonathan Groth in FAQ Personal Injury, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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Wisconsin is home to more than 5,740 for-hire and private interstate trucking businesses.  The corridor from Chicago, Illinois to Oshkosh, Wisconsin is especially loaded with trucks delivering loads. 

As the trucking industry grows and more and more trucks are on the road the likelihood of crashes also increases.  Here are a few thoughts you should consider when hiring a Wisconsin Truck Accident Attorney:

Big rig crashes often have fatal consequences, which is why you need to find a semi truck accident lawyer with adequate experience if you want to get this right.

1. Check the qualifications of an attorney before you hire one. This is very important, because you want to make sure that a lawyer is rated  “superb” according to www.Avvo.com and has published articles on practicing law. It is also essential that the attorney that you hire has recent courtroom experience.  The technology and strategy of trying a case has changed over the years. It is one thing to say “I tried a case and obtained a $1 million verdict” for an injured victim in the 70’s or 80’s.  Today’s trial experience is very different.

2.   Interview Attorneys!  Contact your personal injury attorney so you can meet up over a cup of coffee or lunch. A semi truck accident lawyer (or any personal injury attorney consider any personal injury claim) will more than likely be willing to do this, because personal injury attorneys know the damage that can be caused by a semi truck. 

3. Keep tabs on your case. Make sure that you tell your attorney to keep you updated on the status of your case. Do not call your lawyer each day, but just kindly ask if he could call you or email once every couple weeks for a status update.

4. Find a semi truck accident lawyer that is willing to try your case no matter what. Some personal injury accident want to pull out when it gets heated in the courtroom, so find a tough attorney that will demand justice for you.  Don’t fall for the attorney that says “I’ll settle your case in months not years.”  It is naive to know what the ultimate injury will be and how long a case will take to properly organize and strategize for a maximized settlement.

Follow these tips and you will be able to find a quality semi truck accident attorney in Wisconsin to work with you, and hopefully get you the compensation allowed under the law!

For questions about semi truck collisions in Wisconsin please visit www.grothlawfirm.com or simply call Attorney Jonathan Groth for the chance to interview him regarding your case (877-375-7001). 

Who is Watching You on Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter etc. May 20, 2010

Posted by Attorney Jonathan Groth in FAQ Personal Injury, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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I’ve presented on the topic of using social media and the internet as a sword and shield in litigation.   If you don’t think that insurance companies are trying to avoid liability by following injured parties on social media pages you are mistaken.

Check out this post from the Pennsylvania Law Monitor:

The Internet and social networking sites have changed the face of litigation in this country. However, there are some precautions that you can take to protect yourself, short of boycotting the Internet all together. First, be careful in reviewing the photos and posts on your social networking site. Remove anything that you would not want an insurance company lawyer to see that could help them defend against your case. Next, check your privacy settings which enable you to block certain people from seeing you on a particular site (Facebook allows this). It is also helpful to search your name in the search field and see what comes up to make sure it is acceptable (it is advisable to do this on Google and YouTube as well). Finally never accept friend requests or respond to emails from people you do not know.

Presenting A Future Loss of Earning Capacity Claim (Future Wage Loss) May 19, 2010

Posted by Attorney Jonathan Groth in FAQ Personal Injury, Personal Injury Law, Wisconsin Auto Accidents.
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Some discussion has been had among plaintiff’s attorneys regarding the need for an economist for a claim for future loss of earning capacity (i.e. future wage loss).  Also, because there is a Wisconsin Jury Instruction dicussing reducing a future loss of earning capacity claim to present value there is a debate as to which side has the burden to present evidence regarding interest and inflation rates.

The Wisconsin Court of Appeals has settled this argument.  With Wingad a plaintiff should not need to have an economist testify.  Is it a better practice to have an economist on your side?  If the case is one where it is necessary than your attorney should make the call to an economist. 

I’d recommend that you read Wingad.  Ultimately, it is the defendant’s burden so please don’t forget this.   Let’s not make their job any easier.

We therefore hold the following procedures should apply. The plaintiff, of course, has the ultimate burden of proof upon the quantum of damages. A plaintiff establishes a prima facie case for recovery of future lost earnings by presenting evidence of, for example, projected wage loss, fringe benefits to be lost in the future and life expectancy. A defendant seeking reduction to present value of a sum awarded for loss of future earnings has the burden of going forward with evidence to enable the fact finder to make a rational decision on the award. The defendant benefits from the trial court’s instruction on present value. The reason for such an instruction on present value is obvious. When a jury *453 verdict is based upon the deprivation of future benefits, it will provide more than reasonable compensation if it is formed by merely totaling the loss of future benefits without taking into account the earning power of the money awarded. It is self-evident that a given sum of money now is worth more than an equivalent sum of money payable in the future. We recognize that the calculation of present value may be a difficult computation for the average juror. Therefore, the trial court may allow the defendant to meet this burden on present value by admitting testimony of expert witnesses, or by receiving in evidence the standard interest and annuity tables in which present values are calculated at various rates of interest and for various periods covering the ordinary life expectancies.

Wingad v John Deere & Co, 187 Wis. 2d 441, 523 NW 2d 274